CreatureCast – Echinoderm Skin

posted by Casey Dunn / on January 17th, 2012 / in Echinoderms, imaginescience, Podcast (Student Contribution)

Karen Connolly, from Casey Dunn’s Invertebrate Zoology (Biol 0410) course at Brown University, tells the story of how echinoderms (starfish, sea urchins, and their relatives) can change the stiffness of their skin at will.

Music by Scott Joplin.

CreatureCast – Rhizocephala

posted by Casey Dunn / on January 4th, 2012 / in Arthropods, Parasites, Podcast (Student Contribution)

Stephanie Yin, from Casey Dunn’s Invertebrate Zoology (Biol 0410) course at Brown University, tells the story of a parasitic barnacle with a fascinating lifecycle.

The hand-drawn animations were photographed at the Brown University Science Center. Thanks also to the Granoff Center for the Creative Arts.

Music by King Vitamin, Lino del Vecchio, and Val.

CreatureCast – Jumping Spider

posted by Casey Dunn / on January 4th, 2012 / in Arthropods, Podcast (Student Contribution)

Amber Harris, from Casey Dunn’s Invertebrate Zoology (Biol 0410) course at Brown University, tells the story of jumping spider courtship.

For more information on the mating rituals of jumping spiders visit the Elias Lab.

The hand-drawn animations were photographed at the Brown University Science Center. Thanks also to the Granoff Center for the Creative Arts. Music by scottaltham and Weston Wyse.

Lifecycles, by Manvir Singh

posted by Casey Dunn / on December 23rd, 2011 / in lifecycles

We are pleased to present our first pamphlet – an illustrated guide to the lifecyles of some fascinating organisms. These lifecycles were selected and illustrated by Manvir Singh, a student in Casey Dunn’s Invertebrate Zoology course at Brown. Manvir is also the author of The Evolutionist’s Doodlebook.

Lifecycles is released under a creative commons license, and available for download at archive.org. If you’re interested in purchasing a printed tabloid version of this pamphlet (11.25″ by 15″), contact manvir_singh@brown.edu.

CreatureCast – Anglerfish

posted by Casey Dunn / on December 20th, 2011 / in Podcast (Student Contribution)

Lara Crystal, from Casey Dunn’s Invertebrate Zoology (Biol 0410) course at Brown University, tells the story of how anglerfish find, and keep, a mate.

The hand-drawn animations were photographed at the Brown University Science Center. Audio was recorded at the Granoff Center for the Creative Arts. Music used by permission of North America.

CreatureCast – Tardigrades

posted by Casey Dunn / on December 15th, 2011 / in Podcast (Student Contribution)

Katherine Hadley and Jonathan Leibovic, from Casey Dunn’s Invertebrate Zoology (Biol 0410) course at Brown University, sing a song about tardigrades. They composed the song, performed it with friends, and made the animation.

The hand-drawn animations were photographed at the Brown University Science Center (http://brown.edu/academics/science-center/). This video is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 license.

CreatureCast – Resurrection Fern

posted by Casey Dunn / on December 15th, 2011 / in Extremophiles, Plants, Podcast (Student Contribution)

Rebecca Haumann describes how some plants deal with drought by completely drying out.

This is the first in a series of episodes made as final projects in classes at Brown University in the fall of 2011. The classes were Plant Diversity (Biology 0430), taught by Erika Edwards, and Invertebrate Zoology (Biology 0410), taught by me.

This episode was made by Rebecca Haumann in Erika Edwards’ Plant Diversity course. The hand-drawn animations were photographed at the Brown University Science Center (http://brown.edu/academics/science-center/). It is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 license.

CreatureCast – Passing Cloud

posted by Casey Dunn / on September 7th, 2011 / in molluscs, Podcast, SquidCast

Male kangaroos kick at each other. Male elephant seals gore each other with their large canine teeth. Male Giant Australian cuttlefish also undergo intense competition for females, but besides physically grabbing and biting each other, they also showcase a brilliant pattern on their skin.

Dr. Roger Hanlon who studies cephalopod camouflage at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, MA  describes the mesmerizing “passing cloud” pattern and the purpose behind this agonistic display.

Animation and Audio Editing by Natividad Chen and Kimberly Ulmer. This podcast is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 license.

Gelatinous animals

posted by Casey Dunn / on May 31st, 2011 / in Comb Jellies, Jellies, Siphonophores

Our friend Steve Haddock at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute has posted a video called “There’s no such thing as a jellyfish.” It surveys a broad diversity of animals that are clear and squishy, and explains why there is no one group called “jellyfish”. Many different groups of animals, from stinging cnidarians to swimming snails, have independently become free swimming, gelatinous, and transparent.

CreatureCast – Hollow Trees

posted by Sophia Tintori / on May 20th, 2011 / in Development, lifecycles, Parasites, Plants, Podcast

Here is a little plant that starts it’s life high up in the tree tops, where it can find more light than the dark understory of the rainforest. As it grows though, soon getting enough water becomes limiting factor, and the plant will drop a shoot to the ground.

Matt Ogburn, a graduate student in Erika Edwards’ lab at Brown University, describes this little plant, the strangler fig, and explains how it eventually grows to take over the whole host tree and strangle it to death.

Artwork and editing by Sophia Tintori. Original score by Amil Byleckie. Thanks to Jo Dery for use of her studio. Video released under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 license.